Ask a Question

FAQ

Things you should remember on your GMAT Test day
What computer skills do I need to take a computer-based test?
What exactly is computer-based testing (CBT)?In what respects does CBT differ from Paper-based testing (PBT)? How does the computer-adaptive test work?
What are the conditions like at the Test Centre?
Do I have the option of canceling my score?
What is the GMAT? Who needs to take the GMAT? How important are GMAT scores in the application process? Does the GMAT measure my innate abilities and Can my test taking and scoring skills be honed?
How is the GMAT test scored?
GMAT Verbal Topic Checklist:
GMAT Quantitative Study Checklist
Disabled Test takers can use this link to know about Their GMAT

Things you should remember on your GMAT Test day

Things you should remember on your GMAT Test day:

  • When you check in at the test center, the test administrator will ask you to present valid identification (see Presenting Proper Identification). The administrator will also ask you to agree to the GMAT Examination Testing Rules & Agreement.
  • The test administrator will digitally take your fingerprint, signature, and/or palm vein pattern, and photograph. Audio and video are recorded in the testing room at all centers during the exam. If you refuse to participate in any part of the check-in process or refuse to allow the audio/video recording, you will not be permitted to test and you will forfeit your test fee.
  • Before you start the GMAT exam on a test center workstation, you will be asked to agree to the GMAT Nondisclosure Agreement and General Terms of Use statement. Electronic confirmation of your agreement is required. If you do not agree to the statement, you will not be permitted to take the test and you will forfeit your entire test fee.
  • No testing aids are permitted during the test session or during breaks. Aids include but are not limited to beepers, pagers, pens, calculators, watch calculators, books, pamphlets, notes, blank sheets of paper, rulers, stereos or radios, telephones or cellular (mobile) phones, stopwatches, watch alarms (including those with flashing lights or alarm sounds), dictionaries, translators, thesauri, personal data assistants (PDAs), and any other electronic or photographic devices or potential aids of any kind.
  • The test administrator will provide you with a booklet of five (5) note boards. If you fill up your note boards during the test, please raise your hand; the administrator will collect the note boards you have and give you replacements. You may not remove the note boards from the testing room during or after the test and you must return them to the administrator after the test.
  • Testing must begin promptly once you are seated at the computer. The length of your appointment is approximately four hours.
  • Two optional breaks are scheduled during the test administration. If you exceed the time allowed for these breaks, the excess time will automatically be deducted from the time you have to complete the next section of the test.
  • Testing premises are subject to audio/video recording and other monitoring.
  • You may not communicate with anyone about the content of the GMAT exam while the test session is in progress, during any breaks, or after administration of the test.
  • You will not be allowed to eat, drink, or use tobacco in the testing room you may store such items in a locker and use them during breaks.
  • You will not be permitted to leave the testing room without the test administrators permission. You will be required to provide a digital fingerprint and/or palm vein pattern any time you leave or enter the testing room.
  • During a break, you are required to remain in the test center building or in the immediate area. This policy varies depending on the test center location, and it is your responsibility to ask the test administrator where you are permitted to go - for example, to the nearest restroom or smoking area. If you violate test center policy, the administrator may refuse to allow you to reenter the testing room and continue your exam. Again, if you exceed the time allowed for each optional break, the extra time is deducted from your remaining exam time.
  • Access to telephones, cellular (mobile) phones, or other communication devices will not be permitted during the test session or during breaks.
  • Raise your hand to notify the test administrator if you believe you have a problem with your computer, need a new note board, or need the test administrator for any other reason.
  • Disruptive behavior in any form will not be tolerated. The test administrator has sole discretion in determining what constitutes disruptive behavior. To understand the consequences of a disruption, please see Cancellation of Scores due to Misconduct.
  • The test administrator is authorized to dismiss you from a test session for various reasons, including, without limitation, providing false information; attempting to take the test for someone else; failing to provide acceptable identification; possessing unauthorized personal items or testing aids; refusing to comply with an administrators reasonable requests; giving or receiving unauthorized help; attempting to tamper with the operation of the computer; refusing to follow directions or failing to adhere to any other procedure, policy or rule.
  • For the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) section of the GMAT exam, you will be required to compose two original essays. Plagiarism in any form is unacceptable. GMAC and Pearson VUE reserve the right to cancel GMAT test scores when, in their judgment, there is evidence of plagiarism. As with all other test records, the AWA essays are the property of GMAC, not examinees.
  • Removing or attempting to remove test content from the test center is strictly prohibited. Under no circumstances may any part of the test content viewed during a test administration be removed, reproduced, and/or disclosed in any form by any means (for example, verbally, in writing, or electronically) to any person or entity at any time. This includes, but is not limited to, discussing or disclosing such test content via email; in any Internet chat room, message board, or other forum; or otherwise. This disclosure prohibition applies before, during, and after any administration of the GMAT exam.
  • Once you have completed the exam, you will receive a series of questions asking about your demographics, background, plans for graduate school, and whether you would like to participate in surveys or receive information from GMAC, graduate business schools, scholarship-granting organizations, and/or certain strategic partners of GMAC participating in the Graduate Management Admission Search Service (GMASS). The answers to these questions may be pre-populated with answers you previously provided.

What computer skills do I need to take a computer-based test?

Though previous computer experience is not a prerequisite, familiarity with the use of a personal computer does help. All CBTs have a detailed tutorial before you actually start the test, which tells you how to navigate through the test, how to answer, and what the various buttons on the screen indicate. There is no time limit for this tutorial, so you can make yourself comfortable before you start answering.
The GMAT requires you to type two essays for the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) Section, within a total of sixty minutes. This implies that some practice with the keyboard would certainly help. You do not have to be an expert typist - the AWA is not assessed on the number of words that you type - but some typing experience will surely stand you in good stead.

What exactly is computer-based testing (CBT)?In what respects does CBT differ from Paper-based testing (PBT)? How does the computer-adaptive test work?

In CBT, you appear for an exam that is conducted entirely on the computer. The multiple-choice questions appear on the computer screen along with the answer choices, and you have to indicate your answer choice by clicking the mouse at the appropriate place. 
Other than the fact that the mouse does the work of a pen in case of CBT, the two differ on the following counts : 
Question/Time Ratio : The CBT allows more time per question as compared to PBT, having a fewer number of questions than the PBT.  
Scores : In CBT, you get to know your score immediately on completion of the test. Official score reports, however, are sent to you later by post, just as in case of PBT. 
Skipping questions : Unlike PBT, the CBT does not allow you to leave a question unanswered. You must attempt a question in order to get to the next one. And once you have answered a question, you cannot go back to it.  Adaptive Testing : This is probably the most important difference between the two kinds of tests. The CBT software is such that the level of difficulty of your next question depends on the correctness of your previous response. In other words, no two tests are alike - each examinee will get a different set of questions to attempt based on his or her ability level. 
In a computer-adaptive test, the computer screen displays one question at a time, which is chosen from a very large pool of questions categorized by content and difficulty. The test starts out by posing questions of average difficulty. As you answer those questions, depending on whether you are correct or incorrect, the test poses future questions accordingly. So if you answer a question incorrectly, the next question will be easier, with a smaller point value; and conversely, if you answer the question correctly, the next question will be more difficult, with a larger point value. The larger number of difficult questions you answer, the higher score you receive.

What are the conditions like at the Test Centre?

For taking the test, you will be assigned to an individual testing station (similar to a partitioned cubicle in an office). Other than your admit card and compulsory identification, you cannot carry anything with you - not even a pen. You are provided pencils, a sharpener, and ample sheets for rough work.

Do I have the option of canceling my score?

Yes, you have that option, but the decision to cancel must be made before you view your scores. Once you choose to view scores on the computer screen, you cannot cancel them - either at the test center or later. Once you cancel the scores, you will not be able to view them.

What is the GMAT? Who needs to take the GMAT? How important are GMAT scores in the application process? Does the GMAT measure my innate abilities and Can my test taking and scoring skills be honed?

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a test required by students who want to do their graduate studies in management or business, for example the MBA or DBA. The GMAT test is administered by Pearson VUE.  
If you plan to apply for admission to schools in the US, most probably, yes. In many parts of the world, schools require GMAT as apart of the admissions process. Even if it is not required, the test does provide you with a 'standardized' technique of proving your problem solving abilities, and differentiating you from other applicants to the schools of your choice.  
If you score lower than a cut-off score, you may not be considered for admission by certain schools. If you fall on the 'average score' band, other factors like your GPA assume more importance in the admissions process. If you are an international student planning on studying in the US, GMAT scores are relatively more important. A good GMAT score should be viewed as one of the links in the anchoring chain: it is necessary for each link to be strong to be admitted to a top-notch school, but it is not sufficient.        
In our opinion, your innate abilities represent the clay; how you mould this clay requires skills that can certainly be honed, even from scratch. In short, the answer to the latter part of the question is a resounding yes. With dedication and lots of practice your test taking abilities can be significantly improved.

How is the GMAT test scored?

The GMAT in its Computer adaptive format is also user-adaptive. This means that the questions a user receives is a function of her performance on the test up to that point. This implies that the collective and sequence of questions a user sees is unique. Different questions are weighed differently; more difficult questions carry higher reward. No skipping questions, penalty for unanswered questions, lack of knowledge of upcoming questions, and insertion of random trial questions anywhere in the test, all tend to make the test more attuned to the basic objective of the GMAT to gauge how you respond with your problem solving skills and how you "think on your feet", given the time and resource constraints of the test. 

The test starts with a question of average difficulty. If you answer the question correctly, your score goes up. The question that follows is harder (unless it is a pre-test question). If you answer incorrectly, your score dips. The question that follows is of lower difficulty. The process repeats until you reach the end of the test (either the maximum number of questions, or the time limit of the section). It is important to get a head- start; the early questions are more critical in determining your score on the test. So you may want to expend that extra bit of effort and caution on the earlier questions (maybe recheck the answers, suppress the urge to choose answer A without reading B to E, etc.)

The random pre-test questions do not count towards your score, and will not adapt to your transient score. Try not to waste your time to figure out which of the questions are experimental. Treat all questions as if they aggregate to your final score.

GMAT Verbal Topic Checklist:

Your Verbal skills improvement plan for GMAT must include:   Subject-Verb Agreement, Modifiers, Strategies for Tackling GMAT Sentence Correction, Tenses, Critical Reasoning Skills, Parallelism, Reading Comprehension and its type of Questions, Pronouns, Prepositions and various timed practice tests patterned on the GMAT Verbal section.

GMAT Quantitative Study Checklist

Arithmetic:  Numbers, Fractions, Exponents, Ratios, Percentage, Profit & Loss, Simple & Compound Interest, Speed & Time Problems, Work & Time Problems, Mixtures. 

Algebra: Algebra Basics, Linear Equations, Factorization of Algebraic Equations, Simultaneous Equations, Quadratic Equations, Inequalities.

Geometry: Lines & Angles, Triangles, Quadrilaterals, Circles, Areas & Volumes,  Miscellaneous: Venn Diagrams, Probability, Data Sufficiency.

Disabled Test takers can use this link to know about Their GMAT

If you have a documented disability and would like to request nonstandard testing accommodations, follow the registration procedures described in Register as a Test Taker with Disabilities HERE.